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We live in a day and age when women can have it all – a career, a family, a home, a thriving social life, and more.  Along with this equation you may also find some unwanted additions, such as fatigue and susceptibility to illness, especially during the busy back-to-school season.

The lazy days of summer offer something of a reprieve, what with kids spending their days with relatives, friends, or away at summer camp.  When school starts up again, though, it’s back to carpools, homework, after-school activities, and a lot more stress.  Not only that, but when kids file back into stuffy classrooms, it’s only natural that they bring home germs.

As a busy, working mom, you simply can’t afford to suffer a cold or flu that puts you out of commission.  Having it all is a lofty goal, but it’s also a balancing act.  When you get sick, who’s going to prep that home listing for sale or finish your presentation and deliver it to important corporate clients?  Who’s going to feed the kids and get them to their many activities?

If you’re lucky, you have an assistant or colleagues that can cover your absence and a spouse or family members that can help out with the kids, but let’s be honest, it takes a village to replace you.  A better course of action is to prepare for increased risk of illness when school is back in session by scheduling a Flu Boost at your favorite local IV hydration clinic.  A walloping dose of vitamin C, zinc, and electrolytes can help to boost your immunity to stave off cold and flu, as well as reduce symptoms if you do happen to catch a bug.

Fending off Illness

If you have kids, you understand that they are like massive, walking germ factories, especially when they’re around other kids.  No matter how many times you tell them to cover their mouths when they cough and wash their hands after, well, pretty much any activity, they’re going to touch surfaces that other kids have touched and spread germs hither and yon.  Daycares and schools are repositories of viruses.

As a parent, you’re probably unsurprised to learn that caregivers of young children are at increased risk of becoming ill, as opposed to adults without children.  Factor in the sleep deficit, spotty nutrition, and compromised immunity that are part and parcel of being on the go day and night, and you can see why parents are much more likely to contract illnesses.

The Utah Better Identification of Germs-Longitudinal Viral Epidemiology (BIG-LoVE) study, published in the October 2015 issue of Clinical Infectious Diseases, collected data on 26 households over the course of a year to determine the differences in virus detection between households with children versus single-person households.  The result was that individuals with children exhibited three additional weeks of virus detection, and children themselves experienced even longer durations.

Most parents would guess as much, having first-hand experience with the uptick in illness experienced since having kids.  The question, of course, is what you can do about it.  While frequent and proper hand washing is recommended and fairly doable, suggestions like wearing masks and keeping sick kids isolated could be harder to accomplish in a hectic household.

The truth is that kids are going to get sick.  If you don’t want to follow in their wake, you need to take steps to protect your health.  Since getting more sleep is likely not an option, you’ll want to start with a regular IV vitamin infusion to replenish essential vitamins and nutrients needed to bolster your immune system.  High dose vitamin C IV therapy can be a real life-saver at the beginning of the school year, when added stress and exposure to viruses can quickly derail you.

Stress, in particular, has been shown to deplete vitamin C, which is essential for bodily functions like creating red blood cells, fighting free radicals, and of course, fending off cold and flu viruses.  While you can eat citrus like it’s going out of style, a study from Beloit College in Wisconsin has shown that you’d need 16 oranges a day to maintain optimal levels of vitamin C.

There’s an easier way.  All you have to do is search for a clinic offering vitamin IV drip near me so you can get your dose of vitamin C and other essential vitamins and minerals needed to remain healthy and well despite added risk factors.

Minimizing Impact

Even with a healthy immune system, you just can’t avoid every cold and flu bug, so it’s best to hedge your bets when it comes to protection.  Adding zinc to the mix is a no-brainer, considering it has been found to reduce a wide range of cold symptoms, from congestion and sore throat, to coughing and sneezing, to headache and fever, according to a report published in the Annals of Internal Medicine in July of 1996.

White blood cells rely on zinc for the production of antibodies that fight off pathogens in the body, which is likely why it’s effective at minimizing the impact of a cold or flu, should you catch one.  Since most people focus more on vitamin C than zinc, it doesn’t hurt to choose IV vitamin infusion therapy that includes this vital nutrient.

 Staying Healthy and Strong

So, you’ve bolstered your ability to fight viruses and minimize their impact.  Can you do more?  If you’re not sweating it out at the gym, you might not give much thought to electrolytes, but sodium, potassium, calcium, magnesium, and more are essential to proper body function, and they can become depleted when you’re running from school, to work, to home, and everywhere in between.

Electrolyte imbalance can mess with your heart rate and blood pressure and make you feel weak and ill, and these are just the short-term effects.  If you’re going to get intravenous vitamin C therapy anyway, you might as well choose a cocktail that includes needed electrolytes to round out the package and keep you strong and healthy overall.  When you seek out a reputable IV hydration clinic near me, you’ll enjoy all the benefits of IV vitamin therapy that a busy, working mom really can’t do without.

Sources:
https://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2009/12/04/AR2009120403627.html?noredirect=on
https://academic.oup.com/cid/article/61/8/1217/376653
https://www.webmd.com/women/guide/essential-vitamins-for-women-at-every-age#1
https://www.motherearthliving.com/health-and-wellness/treat-common-cold-vitamin-c-zinc
https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/153188.php